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PTat ABA2009

Page history last edited by Regina Claypool-Frey 14 years, 6 months ago

visitors to this page from 10Mar2009

DISCLAIMER: The information on this site is presented on an "as is" basis, and does not claim to present definitive information, make recommendation or to represent such official bodies such as the Standard Celeration Society. Users of this site agree that the owner of the site or authors of pages and articles are indemnified against legal liability


Conference over. Leaving list posted for reference

 

Precision Teaching related activities at the

ABA International Annual Conference 2009

Phoenix Convention Center

Phoenix, AZ

May 22-26 ,2009

For more information on the conference at ABA International

  1. Friday May 22, 2009
    1. Workshops 10:00am - 5:00pm
        1. Precision Teaching & Celeration Charting
        2. Training teachers, classroom staff, other educational professionals to deliver technology in classroom settings.
    2. Workshops 10:00am - 1:00pm
        1. Integrating speech generating devices (SGD) into ABA programs for children with autism.
    3. Workshops 6:00pm - 9:00pm
        1. Performance management in service delivery for children with autism: Measureing and exemplary staff performance.
        2. Changing thoughts, feelings, & urges.
        3. Successful careers and ethical challenges: Conversations from the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies
  2. Saturday May 23, 2009
    1. Workshops 8:00am - 11:00am
        1. Encouraging happy learner participation in ABA programming: Teaching assent withdrawl and self-advocacy skills.
    2. Presentations 1:00pm - 2:20pm
      1. ABA Interventions for Persons with Acquired Brain Injuries
        1. Precision Teaching and Traumatic Brain Injury.
        2. Effects of Rates of Feedback and Reinforcement on Fluency Outcomes
      2. Producing Generative Outcomes: Part 1: Instructional Innovations.
        1. Generalized Decoding Repertoire.
        2. Creating a Learning Context for Generative Outcomes.
        3. Establishing the Components of Comprehension: A Preliminary Investigation into the Remediation of Comprehension Deficits.
        4. Producing Generative Outcomes in Computation.
      3. The Application of Precision Teaching Methodologies into an inclusive Elementary School Program
        1. “Usability” Checks: Manipulating One to One Teaching Protocols for Maximum Usefulness in Inclusive Environments.
        2. Help...I'm Outnumbered!
    3. 4:00pm - 4:50pm
      1. Math Interventions with Middle School Students
        1. The Role of Diagnostic and Prescriptive Math in Algebraic Preparedness
      2. Five Things that Guarantee School Success, and May Even Close the Achievement Gap for the Disadvantaged Learners.
    4. Posters 6:00pm - 7:30pm
      1. #95 Poster Session AUT
        1. 38. Using Precision Teaching to Teach a 5 year old with ASD to Interpret Figures of Speech. (
        2. 39. Using the Standard Celeration Chart to Teach Young Children with Autism Dramatic Play Skills in a School Setting.
        3. 40. Using the Standard Celeration Chart to Track the Self-advocacy Statements of a Young child with ASD.
      2. #96 Poster Session CBM
        1. 58. The Wall o’ Data: Self-Management Projects at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.
      3. #100 Poster Session EDC
        1. 126. Effects of Response Cost on Academic Skills.
      4. #101 Poster Session OBM
        1. 137. Feedback Procedures to Improve Staff Reinforcement of Client Behavior.
      5. #102 Poster Session VRB
        1. 147. The Effects of Textual Prompting on the Acquisition of Intraverbals in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities.
        2. 150. The Effects of Tact Training on Palilalia in Children with Autism.
  3. Sunday, May 24, 2009
      1. 8:00am - 8:50am STANDARD CELERATION SOCIETY BUSINESS MTG
    1. Presentations
      1. 9:00am - 9:50am
        1. #151 Invited Presenter CHARLES MERBITZ (Chicago School of Professional Psychology)
      2. 9:00am - 10:20am
      3. Ongoing Empirical Investigations of Precision Teaching with Students and Adults with Autism
        1. A Comparison of Discrete Trial Instruction Plus Maintenance to Discrete Trial Instruction Plus Rate Building: A Pilot Study.
        2. The Effects of Precision Teaching Frequency Building of Language Component Skills on the Performance of Language Composite Skills in Adolescents and Adults with Autism.
        3. The Academy for Precision Learning: Using Applied Behavior Analysis to Enhance a Private Elementary Inclusion Program.
      4. #171 Symposium Morningside Academy: What's New?
        1. Providing Explicit Feedback on Daily Report Cards and Classroom Wall Charts to Promote Self-Recording of Active Learning Behaviors.
        2. How to Blend Instructional Programs: Integrating Two Multisyllabic Decoding Programs to Maximize Application and Generativity.
        3. Talk Aloud Problem Solving (TAPS): Defining Problems and Aims.
        4. Combining the Power of Fluency, The Standard Celeration Chart, Reading Comprehension Strategies, Delayed Prompting, and Essay Writing.
      5. 10:30am - 11:50am 
      6. #203 Symposium: Producing Generative Outcomes, Part 2: From Practice to Research
        1. An Investigation of Rapid Automatic Naming as a Generalized Operant.
        2. ? Building the Fluency of Derived Relational Responding: Frames of Coordination and Opposition.
    2. Posters
      1. 5:30pm - 7:00pm
        1. 112. Overcoming Rate-Busting Manipulative to Establish Fluent Math Facts.
        2. 113. Teaching Shoe Tying Using a Large Scale Model.
        3. 115. Improving Oral Reading Fluency in Elementary Students of American Indian Heritage with Learning Disabilities Using the Repeated Reading Instructional Approach.
        4. 116. The Effects of Response Amplitude on the Acquisition of Vocal Verbal Repertoire Using Fluency-Building.
        5. 118. A Comparison of Yoked to Double Yoked Learning Channels on Skill Acquisition, Generalization, and Retention.
        6. 125. The Effects of Fluency-building Compared to Accuracy-only Conditions on Retention and Endurance.
        7. 126. Teaching and Re-teaching Handwriting Skills: Promoting Fluency with Precision Teaching
        8. 127. Endurance and Application in Young Basketball Players: Effects of Fluency in Dribbling.
        9. 129. Precision Teaching with Music Instruction: Are Fluent Fingers Music to Our Ears?
        10. 135. Evaluating Staff Training in an Inclusive Elementary Education Program.
    3. Reunions 8:00pm - 10pm
        1. THE OGDEN R. LINDSLEY STANDARD CELERATION CHART SHARE
      1. ABA Expo  10:00pm - 12:00am
        1. 33. Masters Programme in Applied Behaviour Analysis at the University of Wales, Bangor, UK .
        2. 34. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.
  4. Monday May 25, 2009
    1. Presentations
      1. 10:30am - 11:50am
      2. How We Finally Got There: Analytical Decisions Supported by the Standard Celeration Chart to Help Students Gain New Skills
        1. Treating Schedules of Reinforcement as Critical Features of Instruction to Increase the Frequency of Responding During Instruction in a Child with Phelan-McDermid Syndrome.
        2. Altering Stimulus Control and Variable Instructional Features While Teaching Intermediate/Advanced Language Skills.
        3. If You Give Me a Reason, I Can Show You What I Know.
        4. Altering Stimulus Control to Establish Early Language Skills in Children with Autism. POSTER ATTACHED
      3. 3:00pm - 4:20pm
      4. ABA in the Schools: Using Behavioral Techniques to Help Students in General Education Classrooms
        1. Review of Applications of ABA in the Schools.
      5. Language: Its Role in Indigenous Education, Poverty, and Culture
    2. 3:30-4:50PM
      1. Practice-Based Evidence in Public Education: Systematic On-site Consultation and Special Education for Students with Autism.
        1. Integration of Manualization and Direct Feedback Processes for Training Intensive Teaching of the Verbal Operants. MARY L. BARBERA (PA Verbal Behavior Project)
    3. Posters 12:00 - 1:30PM
      1. #411 Poster Session AUT
        1. 1. Using TAG Teach Methods to Develop Eye Contact Behavior in Children with Autism.
        2. 2. Comparing the Effectiveness of Mobile and Immobile Floors for Teaching Fine Motor Skills.
        3. 35. A Fluency Program Using the “Big 6+6” to Improve Toothbrushing Skills for Children with Autism.
        4. 40. A Comparison of the Instructional Time for Two Tact Instruction Procedures with Adolescents with Autism.
        5. 81. Big 6+6 Instruction with a Student with Severe Physical Impairment.
      2. 6:00-7:30 PM
      3. #487 Poster Session A AUT
        1. 36. Teaching an Adolescent with ASD to Compose an Email.
        2. 37. Teaching an Adolescent to Tact Environmental Triggers and Private Events to Help Improve Self-management Skills.
        3. 39. Fluency and Agility: Outcomes of Teaching Background Knowledge to a 9 Year-Old Boy with Autism. POSTER ATTACHED
      4. #489 Poster Session DDA
        1. 75. Precision Teaching and Speed Reading.
  5. Tuesday May 26, 2009
    1. Presentations
      1. 9:00am - 10:20am
      2. Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of Washington's Center Based Programs for Individuals with ASD
        1. Rising Star Academy: A Successful Inclusive Preschool Program for all Students.
        2. Transition Programming for Adolescents with Autism.
        3. Does Community-Based Instruction Impact Community Members, If so, What Impact Have we Made?

Friday May 22, 2009

Workshops 10:00am - 5:00pm

Precision Teaching & Celeration Charting

#29 F May 22, 10AM-5PM

North 132 BC

TBA

CE Instructor: John Eshleman, Ed.D, BCBA

CLAY M. STARLIN (International Educational Systems Project), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Henry S. Pennypacker (University of Florida), Jesus Rosales-Ruiz (University of North Texas), Abigail B. Calkin (Calkin Consulting Center)

Description: This workshop will teach participants the steps of Precision Teaching with particular emphasis on reading and charting human performance on the Standard Celeration Chart (SCC). Participants will learn: to write precise performance statements (pinpointing), the three important dimensions of behavior to monitor, the features of the SCC, standard charting conventions, and how to analyze performance on the chart to assist in making data-based decisions. The instructors will draw from long and varied histories of success using the SCC in a range of setting to illustrate key concept taught in the workshop. Examples from university teaching, educational intervention with special needs and regular education students, and the monitoring of private events will be used. Participants will receive a copy of the Handbook of the Standard Celeration Chart, all materials used in the workshop, and a CD containing selected articles and an electronic version of the SCC.

 

Photo by John W. Eshleman

Jesus Rosales-Ruiz and Hank Pennypacker

 

Photo by John W. Eshleman

Malcolm D. Neely

 

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Training teachers, classroom staff, other educational professionals to deliver technology in classroom settings.

Workshop #30 CE: PSY/BACB F May 22, 10AM-5PM

North 225

TBA

CE Instructor: Janet Ellis, Ph.D., BCBA

JANET ELLIS (University of North Texas), Matthew Weatherford (University of North Texas, Department of Behavior Analysis), Michelle Carpentieri (University of North Texas, Department of Behavior Analysis), Sandy Magee (University of North Texas)

(...)

Activities: The participants will be able to use sample programs as models for writing programs, use behavioral technology to manage problematic behavior, design datasheets, maintain positive behavioral classroom environment, and half of the attendees will participate in this 3-hr segment.

The other half of attendees will learn to use Precision Teaching to teach students at risk for failure in kindergarten/1st grade (students ages 3-7) to read. After lunch attendees will switch to the other training portion. Participants will be able to implement critical parts of PT and teach students to accurately sound out alphabet letters and read short passages. Workbooks for both procedural trainings are provided.

Top

 

Workshops 10:00am - 1:00pm

Integrating speech generating devices (SGD) into ABA programs for children with autism.

#1 F May 22, 10AM-1PM

North 120 A

AUT

MICHAEL FABRIZIO (Organization for Research and Learning), Kelly J. Ferris (Organization for Research and Learning), Holly Almon-Morris (Organization for Research and Learning)

Description: Published research on how to integrate devices into behavior analytic programs for learners with autism is lacking. Clear instructions on how to effectively design instruction is not available. This workshop will teach participants how to apply component composite analyses of pre-requisite language and motor skills important for successful device use. Participants will learn critical and variable features to consider when designing instruction for SGD users, application of Verbal Behavior as a system of analysis for SGD users, discussion of essential features to consider in selecting a device and designing the user profile, and measurement pinpoints for evaluating language improvement. Sample charted student data will be shown to demonstrate how to measure learning progress with the standard celeration chart across micro and meta-levels of data collection. Participants will all receive CD-ROMs of all presentation materials include sample video footage used in the presentation. Recommended readings related to the research on SGD use will also be provided.

 


Workshops 6:00pm - 9:00pm

Performance management in service delivery for children with autism: Measureing and exemplary staff performance.

Workshop #42 F 6:00-9:00PM

CE: PSY/BACB

North 121 A

AUT

CE Instructor: Kelly Ferris, Masters, BCBA

KRISTIN N WILKINSON (Organization for Research and Learning), Kelly J. Ferris (Organization for Research and Learning), Krista Zambolin (Organization for Research and Learning)

Description: This workshop will provide participants multiple opportunities to learn how to evaluate service delivery staff performance in three critical areas: verbal behavior about the service being delivered, contingency-shaped behavior involved in delivering the service, and verbally-mediated behavior involved in problem solving related to the service being delivered. Sample forms and feedback systems will be shown, and participants will practice evaluating staff performance via contrived practice arrangements and videotape review. Each participant will receive a CD-ROM containing all of the materials, sample forms, and videotape examples used in the workshop as well as an annotated bibliography containing relevant references from the literature.

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Changing thoughts, feelings, & urges.

#52 F 6:00-9:00PM

CE: PSY/BACB

North 120 A

CBM

CE Instructor: Abigail B. Calkin, Ph.D.

ABIGAIL B. CALKIN (Calkin Consulting Center), Emma F. Douglas (The Treehouse Trust)

Description: Inner behaviors—thoughts, feelings, and urges—are observable, countable, and changeable. The main emphasis in this workshop is to develop a plan to change the inner behavior of the participant and/or one’s clients. Participants will develop this plan based on research using Behavior Analysis and Precision Teaching principles and practices to observe, count, and change the targeted inner behavior. The workshop also gives a brief review of the history of private events, inner behavior, and some of the research.

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Successful careers and ethical challenges: Conversations from the Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies

#63 F 6:00 - 9:00PM

CE: BACB

North 221 AB

OBM

CE Instructor: Rob Holdsambeck, Ed.D., BCBA

ROBERT D. HOLDSAMBECK (Holdsambeck and Associates, Inc.), Henry S. Pennypacker (University of Florida), Darnell Lattal (Aubrey Daniels International), Andrew S. Bondy (Pyramid Educational Consultants) 

Description: This workshop has its origins in the observation that one of the best ways to learn to become successful in your field is to listen to the stories of those that have traveled that path before. It is equally important to hear how the pursuit of business success can encounter ethical challenges along the way. The Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies is a non-profit organization dedicated to the science of ABA and its ethical applications. This event chaired by Dr. Holdsambeck, features three well known behavior analysts from CCBS who will share their successes and challenges.

 

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Saturday May 23, 2009

Workshops 8:00am - 11:00am

Encouraging happy learner participation in ABA programming: Teaching assent withdrawl and self-advocacy skills.

#77 Sa May 23, 8-11MA

CE: PSY/BACB

North 225

AUT

CE Instructor: Holly Almon-Morris, M.S., BCBA

HOLLY ALMON-MORRIS (Organization for Research and Learning), Kristin N. Schirmer-Foley (Organization for Research and Learning), Kristin N Wilkinson (Organization for Research and Learning), Rebecca E. Phillips (Organization for Research and Learning)

Description: In order to assure a “goodness of fit” standard in autism intervention programs, it is of utmost importance that students be active and willing participants in their learning environments. Therefore, students must be able to advocate for themselves in a manner appropriate to their language level. If students can appropriately advocate for themselves, misbehavior during instruction should be either non-existent or present at very low levels. This workshop will address several topographies of assent withdrawal and self-advocacy skills, questions to consider when determining the function of assent withdrawal behaviors, strategies for teaching appropriate assent withdrawal/self-advocacy behaviors, and modifying instruction according to various student assent withdrawal/self-advocacy behaviors. The content of this workshop will be related to ethical guidelines from the BACB Guidelines for Responsible Conduct for Behavior Analysts ©.

 

Top


Using Excel for Displaying and Analyzing Treatment Outcomes in Applied Settings

#91

North 130 SA May 23, 8-11AM

OTH

CE Instructor: Donald Stenhoff, PhD, BCBA

DONALD M. STENHOFF (University of Kentucky), Bryan J. Davey (ACCEL), Eleazar Vasquez, III (University of Central Florida)

NB- Only describing SCCs within context of other data display systems using Excel.

Objectives: At the conclusion of this workshop participants will be able to:

...Create graphs for alternating treatment, reversal, multiple-baseline designs, standard celeration, and cumulative records...

 

Top




Presentations 1:00pm - 2:20pm

ABA Interventions for Persons with Acquired Brain Injuries

#25 Symposium

5/23/2009

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

North 222 C

CBM; Applied Behavior Analysis

Chair and Discussant: Michael P. Mozzoni (Learning Services NeuroBehavioral Institute

 

Precision Teaching and Traumatic Brain Injury.

TAMRY L JUNTUNEN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: The purpose of this study was to assess the utility of SAFMEDS training on tacting in a 57-year-old Caucasian male with an acquired brain injury resulting from cardiac arrest secondary to electrocution who was 35 years post injury. Two primary SAFMEDS decks were used, each containing thirty-five cards. All cards displayed color pictures of items relating to activities of daily living. Correct responses were counted as any vocal response that would lead to acquisition of the desired item in a natural environment. The decks of cards were split into several decks. Varying amount of cards and time limits were used to evaluate which procedure works best in the TBI population. Results indicate that tailoring the exposure to each stimulus may result in faster acquisition of desired information. Smaller decks or increased exposure to stimuli was the best procedure for this individual. Results suggest that individuals with TBI may benefit from Precision Teaching methodology, specifically when the procedures are adapted to the individual client.

 

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Effects of Rates of Feedback and Reinforcement on Fluency Outcomes

#34 Paper Session

5/23/2009

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

North 225

EAB

Experimental Analysis of Human Behavior I

Chair: Vennessa L. Walker (West Virginia University)

(Experimental Analysis) VENNESSA L. WALKER (West Virginia Wesleyan College), Philip N. Chase (Cambridge Center for Behavioral Studies)

Abstract: Precision teaching claims to produce fluency outcomes such as stability, retention, and adduction, but the critical components of precision teaching are unclear. Ten middle-school students were assigned to receive feedback and token reinforcement either every 1 min (high rate) or every 15 min (low rate). Subjects used a computer program to learn 5 basic algebra skills at high rates and high accuracy. Subjects were yoked with a partner for practice so that each member of the pair completed the same number of items per skill. Subjects completed cumulative review worksheets and then were tested for stability, adduction, and retention. Results suggest that a high rate of feedback and reinforcement facilitates faster acquisition of skills as well as better performance on cumulative reviews, stability, and retention tests compared to low rate. Subjects were generally unable to complete the adduction items, however, suggesting that the current procedures may be inadequate for producing generalization of skills.

 

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Producing Generative Outcomes: Part 1: Instructional Innovations.

#37 Symposium

5/23/2009

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

North 122 A

EDC/TPC; Applied Behavior Analysis

Chair: Kimberley L. M. Zonneveld (University of Nevada, Reno)

Abstract: Producing generalized effects serves as a primary goal for applied behavior analysts. However, such a goal often occurs as an after-thought rather than as an explicitly programmed outcome. The papers included in the current symposium will outline four instructional strategies explicitly designed to produce generative repertoires with learners in academic settings. One paper will illustrate the benefits of using nonsense words for the establishment of a generalized spelling repertoire. The establishment of a generative computation repertoire produced through the training of math fact families will be outlined in a second paper. A third paper will describe a relational learning program used to establish emergent comprehension skills in students with language-based deficits. The final paper will articulate how an instructional control program was used to establish generalized attending and self-awareness skills with a learner, which resulted in a transformation of that learner’s overall teach-ability. All papers will include outcome data obtained with learners attending a private learning center. Future research directions stemming from these clinical outcomes will be offered.

 

Generalized Decoding Repertoire.

MARIA T. STEVENSON (University of Nevada, Reno - student), Kimberly Nix Berens (Center for Advanced Learning, Inc.)

Abstract: The present study utilized the standard celeration chart to determine if participants could generalize a decoding repertoire to learn how to sound out and read words. Specifically, the authors evaluated if participants could generalize the phonetic rules of speech by learning how to sound out nonsense words (e.g., fic, sul) to real words without being directly taught how to read real words. Participants were children who were not able to read or decode words. During the training condition, participants were taught to decode and read nonsense words (e.g., fic, sul). In addition, probes were conducted each week to determine if participants were able to generalize the phonetic rules learned during the training condition to real words. Additional pre/post assessment to real words that participants were not exposed to during training or probes were utilized to further assess their ability to decode and read words.

 

Creating a Learning Context for Generative Outcomes.

TIMOTHY C. FULLER (Washoe County School District), Kendra L. Rickard (University of Nevada, Reno - Center for Advanced L), Kimberly Nix Berens (Center for Advanced Learning, Inc.)

Abstract: Programming for generative learning outcomes is an advantageous goal for those in any instructional setting. The present paper will outline how standard measurement practices can lead to the design of an instructional context, which promotes generative outcomes. A conceptual analysis of this instructional context will be outlined and data from several students will be used to support these conceptualizations. More specifically, the emergence of self-awareness and generalized forms of attending will be highlighted as products of an intervention designed to increase instructional control.

 

Establishing the Components of Comprehension: A Preliminary Investigation into the Remediation of Comprehension Deficits.

CYNTHIA CARDENAS (University of Nevada, Reno), Kendra L. Rickard (University of Nevada, Reno - Center for Advanced L), Kimberly Nix Berens (Center for Advanced Learning, Inc.)

Abstract: Reading fluency has been implicated as a critical factor in the remediation of reading comprehension deficits. As fluency is established, collateral improvements are often observed in reading comprehension as well. However, for some learners, collateral improvements are not observed. As comprehension is inherently relational, this failure to improve is likely due to deficits in core language processes. Specifically, core relational skills involved in both listening and reading comprehension are likely not well established. Using a relational frame theory approach, the current presentation will consider the skills inherent in comprehension, as well as how multiple exemplar training of key relations can have a generative effect on untrained relations. Clinical data will be shown and directions for future research suggested.

 

Producing Generative Outcomes in Computation.

KIMBERLEY L. M. ZONNEVELD (University of Nevada, Reno), Kendra L. Rickard (University of Nevada, Reno - Center for Advanced L), Kimberly Nix Berens (Center for Advanced Learning, Inc.)

Abstract: The current state of math instruction appears analogous to the whole language approach to reading instruction, whereby students learn each word in a given language. A consensus now exists with respect to the generative effects observed in an individual’s reading repertoire following the direct instruction of a small set of phonemic rules. However, such an agreement is not observed in the area of mathematics. Currently, students learn each individual computational problem via direct training rather than receive direct instruction on a small set of math fact families, which can then be applied to numerous computational problems. This presentation will discuss the efficacy of a specific method of math instruction that combines The Morningside Mathematics Fluency: Math Facts program with The Center for Advanced Learning’s math curriculum. In particular, existing clinical data will be presented on the generalized computational repertoire that results from the direct instruction of a small set of fact families. Finally, conceptual issues regarding this particular method of teaching will be addressed

 

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The Application of Precision Teaching Methodologies into an inclusive Elementary School Program

#38 Symposium

5/23/2009

1:00 p.m. - 2:20 p.m.

North 121 BC

EDC/AUT; Service Delivery

Chair and Discussant: Alison L. Moors (Academy for Precision Learning)

Abstract: Throughout the years, Precision Teaching methodologies have been linked to successful implementations within programs which serve general education students, those with learning disabilities/Attention problems and in one on one teaching situations with students on the autism spectrum. This symposium will highlight the use of Precision Teaching methodologies within a private elementary school with a special focus on including all types of learners (from gifted, to general education to those with learning disabilities to those diagnosed on the autism spectrum). Data will be presented which highlights the effectiveness of the staff training protocol in place, the successful strategies for classroom management for multiple students working on timed practice simultaneously and how to program for skill sets that successfully generalize into general education classrooms. This symposium will help professionals identify the critical features necessary for implementation of an effective inclusion program whereas all students are learning to their maximum potential using Precision Teaching.

 

“Usability” Checks: Manipulating One to One Teaching Protocols for Maximum Usefulness in Inclusive Environments.

LOVELLE T SUAREZ (Academy for Precision Learning), Alison L. Moors (Academy for Precision Learning)

Abstract: This study investigates the systematic manipulation of structured one on one Fluency Based Instruction teaching methods and the effects of those manipulations on the application of those skill sets within and across learning environments. All participants in the study are between the ages of 6 and 12, have a diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorder, and attend a private inclusive elementary program. All data was collected in situ by a variety of school staff members throughout the school day (6 ½ hours). Findings of the study provide information regarding successful manipulations of structured teaching time in order to increase the “usability “ and accuracy of those skill sets in a more naturalistic environment.

 

Help...I'm Outnumbered!

NICOLE GEORGIS (Academy for Precision Learning), Alison L. Moors (Academy for Precision Learning)

Abstract: A common complaint of teachers attempting to implement Precision Teaching methodologies into their general education classrooms is the perceived amount of teacher effort required to follow the protocol. How does one person deliver individualized precision teaching to a group of students? This paper will present one classroom teachers’ methods for incorporating Precision Teaching into her classroom. Participants were students in an inclusive private elementary 5th grade classroom. Student abilities range from general education to Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder and those on the Autism Spectrum. Data will be presented to show student progress on academic skills as a result of peer coaching, student’s charting their own practice data and student’s learning effective study strategies.

 

Staff Training and its Impact on Student Success VALORI N. BERENDS (Academy for Precision Learning), Alison L. Moors (Academy for Precision Learning)

Abstract: This study evaluated the effect of implementing a staff training tool/feedback and its effect on child progress in an inclusive elementary education program which utilizes Precision Teaching methodologies with its students. This program is a private school for students ages 6-12 years of age. The students’ abilities range across the autism spectrum. Five male and female staff members participated in the study. Staff ages ranged from 20 to 30 years and these staff had a variety of entering experience levels with implementing Precision Teaching methodologies in previous work settings. The study used a comparison design, and the program’s clinical director implemented the staff training tool and provided feedback to staff. Participants collected data on child goal-attainment and the number of tasks completed during instructional time. Findings of the study indicate the validity of the staff training tool and feedback for effecting child progress.

 

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4:00pm - 4:50pm

Math Interventions with Middle School Students

#91 Paper Session

5/23/2009

4:00 p.m. - 4:50 p.m.

North 121 BC

EDC

Chair: Jennifer Testa (St Cloud State University)

 

The Role of Diagnostic and Prescriptive Math in Algebraic Preparedness

(Service Delivery) JENNIFER TESTA (Morningside Academy), Geoffrey H. Martin (Morningside Academy), Julian Gire (Morningside Academy), Kent Johnson (Morningside Academy)

Abstract: The National Mathematics Advisory Panel noted that mathematics achievement drops drastically as students encounter Algebra late in their middle school years. This decrease is partially a result of the cascading effects of dysfluency in component repertoires, which have broad implications as learners encounter progressively higher-order math. Accordingly, skill deficits in basic computation and conceptual understanding become most apparent once students are expected to recruit the wide range of component repertoires required in Algebra.

“Morningside Mathematics Foundations “ is a corrective math program that takes a diagnostic and prescriptive approach. The program diagnoses specific component skill deficits through a precision

placement test and prescribes an individualized program involving explicit instruction and rate-building practice. The long-term goal of the program is to fill the holes in the learner's computational repertoire. Because success in algebra is heavily predicated on mastery and facility of foundational skills, this program can drastically increase the probability of success in Algebra.

This talk will address how Morningside's math program fulfills the panel's mathematics pedagogy recommendations, specifically focusing on curricular content, learning process, and instructional practices. Moreover, it will reveal how the program will foster a repertoire that prepares the learner for success in Algebra.

 

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Five Things that Guarantee School Success, and May Even Close the Achievement Gap for the Disadvantaged Learners.

5/23/2009

4:00 p.m. - 4:50 p.m.

West 301 CD

EDC; Applied Behavior Analysis

Chair: Cathy L. Watkins (California State University, Stanislaus)

RICHARD P. WEST (Utah State University)

Abstract: Participants will learn why much of what we have been told about learning and school success simply isn’t enough to get the job done. In this era of increased accountability and pressure to meet standards, what really makes the biggest difference? How can we support teachers and enable them to do what they have been prepared to do? Tools and procedures for data-based decision-making will be described and explained.

 

Posters 6:00pm - 7:30pm

#95 Poster Session AUT

5/23/2009

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

North Hall A

 

38. Using Precision Teaching to Teach a 5 year old with ASD to Interpret Figures of Speech. (

(EDC; Applied Behavior Analysis) JENNA RUDO-STERN (FEAT of WA), Kristin N. Schirmer-Foley (Organization for Research and Learning & FEAT of Washington), Elizabeth B Snyder (FEAT of Washington), Brandi Michelle Allred (FEAT of Washington)

Abstract: This data-based poster will use a standard celeration chart to demonstrate interventions used to teach a five year old with ASD how to interpret figures of speech. It will also present incidental data showing generalization of the skill to wider classroom use.

 

39. Using the Standard Celeration Chart to Teach Young Children with Autism Dramatic Play Skills in a School Setting.

(EDC; Applied Behavior Analysis) BRANDI MICHELLE ALLRED (FEAT of Washington), Kristin N. Schirmer-Foley (Organization for Research and Learning & FEAT of Washington), Elizabeth B Snyder (FEAT of Washington)

Abstract: This data-based poster will demonstrate how dramatic play skills were taught to 3 preschoolers (2 on the autism spectrum and 1 typical peer model) in a school setting. Data will show the generalization of taught dramatic play skills to the classroom including initiations, reciprocations, and number of new ways played.

 

40. Using the Standard Celeration Chart to Track the Self-advocacy Statements of a Young child with ASD.

(EDC; Applied Behavior Analysis) SARA GOLDSTEIN (FEAT of Washington), Kristin N. Schirmer-Foley (Organization for Research and Learning & FEAT of Washington), Elizabeth B Snyder (FEAT of Washington), Brandi Michelle Allred (FEAT of Washington)

Abstract: This data-based poster will show data on the number of appropriate self advocacy statements the student made throughout the school year, as well as breaks requested and misbehaviors. It will also show the effects that teaching self-advocacy statements had on the number of misbehaviors the student engaged in and the number of breaks he requested on a daily basis.

 

#96 Poster Session CBM

5/23/2009

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

North Hall A

 

58. The Wall o’ Data: Self-Management Projects at The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

(CSE; Applied Behavior Analysis) KYOSUKE KAZAOKA (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Jennifer Klapatch (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Kerin Ann Weingarten (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Tamry L Juntunen (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Marissa J Tybor (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Traci M. Cihon (The

Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Diana J. Walker (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: Students and faculty of The Chicago School of Professional Psychology’s Applied Behavior Analysis Department participated in self-monitoring and/or behavior-change projects. Participants collected data on the relevant dimensions of behavior they wanted to track or change (e.g., frequency or duration of working out, frequency of smoking) . They were encouraged to create their own intervention plans and implement them and to evaluate the effects on their behavior. Data were publicly posted, and input from other students and faculty was encouraged. This input took the form of social consequences and/or suggestions for intervention. Data and interventions will be presented.

 

112. The Hidden Transformer: Using a Tactile Prompt to Reduce Problem Behavior with Children with Emotional-Behavior Disorders. (Applied Behavior Analysis) CHRISTY SHAFFER (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Traci M. Cihon (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Charles Merbitz (Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: Children with Emotional-Behavior disorders exhibit a diverse array of problem behaviors that are often resistant to change through traditional interventions. Self-monitoring has been effective at reducing problem behaviors and has shown maintenance and generalization of treatment effects. Self-monitoring incorporates a stimulus prompt to direct the individual’s attention to their current behaviors. However, the effectiveness of the intervention may be limited if the cue is perceived as intrusive or disruptive. This study assessed the effects of a tactile prompt in a self-monitoring procedure on on-task and disruptive behaviors with children with emotional behavior disorders.

 

#100 Poster Session EDC

5/23/2009

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

North Hall A

EDC

 

 

126. Effects of Response Cost on Academic Skills.

(TBA; Applied Behavior Analysis) MARK MALADY (University, Nevada Reno), Josh Pritchard (University of Nevada, Reno), Linda J. Hayes (University of Nevada, Reno)

Abstract: The study of punishment has declined rapidly over the past few decades due to societal pressure unrelated to scientific pursuit. Unfortunately, while the examination of this principle and related procedures may have declined, this is not indicative of its occurrence in the lives of people. Therefore, until it is no longer an interaction that occurs commonly, we must not cease investigating it. This current study focuses on response cost, a punishment procedure which has been examined in the literature and demonstrated as an effective means to decrease problem behavior. There has, however, been limited examination into the effects of response cost on academic skills. In educational settings where skill acquisition is equally, if not more important, than behavior deceleration, this relationship is paramount. The current investigation examines an analogue analysis of a classroom point system and the effects of response cost on the acquisition of academic skills. Specifically, the study aims to compare the differences which arise between pre and post-test scores on new mathematical skills when utilizing positive-reinforcement only, response cost, and no contingent consequences. Data will be collected

 

#101 Poster Session OBM

5/23/2009

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

North Hall A

 

137. Feedback Procedures to Improve Staff Reinforcement of Client Behavior.

(Service Delivery) KERIN ANN WEINGARTEN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Charles Merbitz (Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: Performance management is a behavior analytic system for changing behavior in the workplace. Empirical methods are used to analyze human performance across environments, to not only improve staff persons quality of work, but also to analyze methods that foster productivity and accomplishment. The Six Boxes™ model (Binder, 2007) represents such a comprehensive categorical system that analyzes variables into six categories across environments and individuals; this system helps one to identify areas within an organization that could use improvement. One box of the six is labeled ‘expectations and feedback;’ expectations and feedback are the primary components to evaluate in any environment. Feedback procedures have been widely used across many settings and subjects to improve behavior performance and increase communication. This research project investigated to which extent staff persons’ performance could be improved through the application of a treatment package including expectations and feedback procedures. The treatment package included (1) an in-service training session, (2) stating expectations prior to the observation, (3) a written feedback form highlighting the positive behaviors emitted by the staff person, together with (4) the delivery of a token for every correct response made. This treatment package appeared to be an effective and all-positive approach to improve staff persons reinforcement of client behavior at a vocational training agency.

 

#102 Poster Session VRB

5/23/2009

6:00 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

North Hall A

 

147. The Effects of Textual Prompting on the Acquisition of Intraverbals in Individuals with Developmental Disabilities.

(DDA; Applied Behavior Analysis) JILL MEISTE (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Traci M. Cihon (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: We examined the effects text prompts had on the acquisition of intraverbals with individuals with developmental disabilities. A multiple baseline across participants was used to increase the number of intraverbals (answers to safety and conversation questions) established. For example a question may include “what is your favorite movie? “ The response or textual prompt would include “my favorite movie is Batman. “ Transfer of stimulus control and prompt fading were used to establish the intraverbal repertoires under the control of vocal stimuli. A fluency program for component reading skills was added for some participants to determine whether it enhanced acquisition of intraverbals via the text prompts. Results are discussed in terms of the effectiveness of the transfer of stimulus control procedure with and without the fluency based instruction on component reading skills.

 

150. The Effects of Tact Training on Palilalia in Children with Autism.

(AUT; Applied Behavior Analysis) ERIN M GUZINSKI (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Traci M. Cihon (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: This study investigated the effects of a tact correction procedure on delayed non-contextual repetitive speech (i.e., palilalia) with children with autism. The experiment was an extension of Hugh-Pennie (2006), who also tested the effects of the tact correction procedure on palilalia. A multiple baseline across participants design was used. Data were collected on the frequency of palilalia and the frequency of mands and tacts. A generalization probe was conducted to assess generalization across settings. The results are discussed in terms of the decrease in maladaptive palilalic speech, with an emphasis on the acquisition of more functional vocal verbal behavior.

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Sunday, May 24, 2009

 

8:00am - 8:50am STANDARD CELERATION SOCIETY BUSINESS MTG

#143 Business Meeting

5/24/2009

8:00 a.m. - 8:50 a.m.

North 131 BC

Chair: William J. Helsel (AGILE Learner''s Program/PLEA)

Purpose: The Standard Celeration Society promotes use of the Standard Celeration Chart, both for furthering the science of behavior and of learning, as well as for developing practical applications based on that science. In adherence to the By-laws of the society, an annual business meeting is to be held at the ABAI Convention to discuss membership, actions of the executive group, the Journal of Precision Teaching and Celeration, the annual conference, and financial report.

http://www.abainternational.org/convention/downloads/5.24.09-7a-Mtgs.pdf

 

 

 

 

Presentations

9:00am - 9:50am

#151 Invited Presenter CHARLES MERBITZ (Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

5/24/2009

9:00 a.m. - 9:50 a.m.

West 301 CD

OTH; Applied Behavior Analysis

Mainstream Behavior Analysis: Eight Decades of Applications and Growing

Chair: William L. Heward (Ohio State University)

CHARLES MERBITZ (Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Charles T. Merbitz, Ph.D., BCBA, is currently Chair of the Department of Applied Behavior Analysis at the Chicago School of Professional Psychology. Since 2004, when he began the ABA Program, the Department has grown to over 100 graduate students and seven faculty members. Dr. Merbitz has 35 years of experience in applications of scientific methods to learning, including the design and implementation of effective school programs in both Regular and Special Education, service delivery as a school psychologist, federally-supported researcher in rehabilitative medicine, and university professor. Dr. Merbitz has a national reputation in the rehabilitation and behavioral communities for research involving objective process measures for relating interventions to outcomes and outcome measures. Dr. Merbitz has published numerous articles, chapters and two books, and has served as reviewer for NIDRR (the National Institute of Disability and Rehabilitation Research) and the journals Stroke, Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Behavior Research Methods Instruments and Computers, Journal of Precision Teaching, and The Behavior Analyst. He served on the Board of Directors of the American Association of Spinal Cord Injury Psychologists and Social Workers, for whom he helped write SCI treatment standards. He currently serves ABAI as Coordinator of the Education Board.

Abstract: As of 2008 it has been 80 years since the publication of Behavior of Organisms began the Experimental Analysis of Behavior, and 50 years since the inception of JABA inaugurated the field of Applied Behavior Analysis (ABA). In these few decades the field has grown tremendously, both in the numbers of professionals identifying themselves as practicing or teaching ABA, and in the range of problems and issues that are addressed successfully by mainstream behavior analysis. However, ABA frequently remains conspicuous by its absence in discussions of human problems and their solutions, in both professional and popular discourse. One perspective on this information gap is that as some other helping disciplines continue to define themselves in the light of postmodernism, ABA professionals have strengthened the commitment to natural science and selectionism. Nonetheless, ABA continues to grow, and as this brief survey of the field shows, the range of successful applications, training venues, and opportunity in ABA is striking. As a field ABA seems poised for even further dramatic expansion.

 

9:00am - 10:20am

#153 Symposium

5/24/2009

9:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

North 124 B

AUT/EDC; Applied Behavior Analysis

Ongoing Empirical Investigations of Precision Teaching with Students and Adults with Autism

Chair: Donna L. Sloan (Rutgers University, Douglas Developmental Disabili)

Discussant: Charles Merbitz (Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: Precision Teaching with rate building procedures is one method that holds promise as an efficient and effective means of instruction for younger and older learners with autism. These papers represent pilot research that examines the effects of frequency building. This research also compares the effects of various procedural aspects of frequency-building procedures as well as begins to investigate the comparative effectiveness to other ABA techniques.

 

A Comparison of Discrete Trial Instruction Plus Maintenance to Discrete Trial Instruction Plus Rate Building: A Pilot Study.

MARLENE COHEN (Rutgers University - DDDC), Meredith Bamond (Rutgers University), Christopher Manente (Rutgers University, DDDC), Mary Jane Weiss (Rutgers University)

Abstract: The outcomes of precision teaching with rate building (stability, endurance, application and retention or SEAR) have been empirically validated. The question then becomes whether these outcomes are specific to rate building or if the outcomes can be empirically validated through typical maintenance procedures. This pilot study, will examine SEAR outcomes for two sets of spelling words taught to accuracy using discrete trial instruction. One set is kept on weekly maintenance while the other is taught to fluent rates. SEAR outcomes are compared and will be demonstrated. Direction for future research will also be discussed.

 

The Effects of Precision Teaching Frequency Building of Language Component Skills on the Performance of Language Composite Skills in Adolescents and Adults with Autism.

MARY SENS AZARA (Rutgers University, DDDC), Marlene Cohen (Rutgers University - DDDC), Donna L. Sloan (Rutgers University, Douglas Developmental Disabili)

Abstract: Each year more and more learners are aging out of school programs and moving into adult programs. More needs to be done to provide least restrictive and quality services for these adults. Precision teaching with frequency building procedures is one method that holds promise as an efficient and effective means of instruction for older learners. This research is proposed as an attempt to extend previous clinical demonstrations of the profound impact of Precision Teaching with frequency building procedures on the functional use of fine motor skills, into the realm of language skill acquisition. Previously, pilot research in this area has indicated results similar to those of fine motor skill studies, when implementing frequency building of verbal language components. Preliminary results indicate the application to new, untaught skills has a cumulative effect of more rapid acquisition of related language skills. Using a multiple baseline design, this research continues to explore whether instruction of component language skills would end when minimum frequency aims are initially achieved, or if continuing instruction of component skills to higher frequencies enhances performance of language composite skills. The proposed research will examine the cumulative effect of frequency building of three component skills on performance of a single composite skill.

 

The Academy for Precision Learning: Using Applied Behavior Analysis to Enhance a Private Elementary Inclusion Program.

ALISON L. MOORS (Academy for Precision Learning)

Abstract: This paper will present the results of the inaugural year for a private elementary program specializing in applying the teaching methodologies from the field of Applied Behavior Analysis to an inclusive education program. The Academy for Precision Learning is for students ages Kindergarten-5th grade whose cognitive abilities range from general education to learning disabled to moderately autistic. The presentation will focus on the educational model implemented as well as the necessary components for its success. Data will be presented to illustrate student progress on nationally normed achievemetests, curriculum based measurement probes and daily practice on individualized education plans.

 

#171 Symposium Morningside Academy: What's New?

5/24/2009

9:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

North 122 A

EDC/N/A; Service Delivery

Morningside Academy: What's New?

Chair: Joanne K. Robbins (Morningside Academy)

Abstract: This symposium is one in an ongoing, annual series that provides updated information and data on the Morningside Model of Generative Instruction, and its application in our Morningside Academy laboratory school. In our lab school, we investigate promising curricula or instructional procedures, measure their effectiveness, and revise our curriculum and instruction protocols as the data suggests. All presentations describe teacher designed and implemented procedures. Presentation #1 by Reilly and Stretz investigates interventions designed to strengthen student learning skills to increase performance outcomes. Presentation #2 by Isbell, Ganzeveld, Vu, Wolfson & Johnson describes a blending of two decoding programs to maximize their effectiveness and generativity. Presentation #3 by Landau, Lybarger, Wolfson & Robbins describes improvements to our thinking and problem solving program, TAPS. Presentation #4 by Delgado describes improvements in our reading comprehension program.

 

Providing Explicit Feedback on Daily Report Cards and Classroom Wall Charts to Promote Self-Recording of Active Learning Behaviors.

JENNIFER REILLY (Morningside Academy), Adam G. Stretz (Morningside Academy)

Abstract: Typical methods at Morningside for motivating students to improve their academic performance include the teacher giving immediate specific feedback for target behaviors on a daily report card and publicly displaying academic performance of each student in the classroom. This proves to be a successful system for many of our learners, but for some, explicit teaching of target skills on the report card seem necessary. A self-recording tracking sheet that identifies specific active learning behaviors has been developed for at-risk students to recognize specific behaviors necessary for learning to occur. These behaviors have been grouped by levels on a continuum that increases the level of responsibility for the student to interact with instruction. Data have been collected over the past two years suggesting a correlation of numbers of years gained on national Reading Comprehension measures and the Level of Active Behavior demonstrated by students. Using performance data from wall charts, students are identified as at-risk for not making academic gains. For these students specific active learning behaviors are targeted, explicitly taught and monitored by both students on their tracking sheet and teachers on the daily report card. This inquiry attempts to examine the effectiveness of the self-recording tracking sheet of active behaviors in improving academic performance for at-risk learners.

 

How to Blend Instructional Programs: Integrating Two Multisyllabic Decoding Programs to Maximize Application and Generativity.

SHILOH ISBELL (Morningside Academy), Sarah E Ganzeveld (Morningside Academy), Michael P. Wolfson (Morningside Academy), Kent Johnson (Morningside Academy)

Abstract: The program, “Reading Excellence: Word Attack & Rate Development Strategies (REWARDS),” by Anita Archer, is a widely used decoding program at Morningside Academy. It has been very efficacious in teaching struggling readers the basics of sounding out words by knowing word parts and vowel combinations. However, it does not include explicit instruction on how to blend sounds and word parts together and accent particular word parts to form conventional-sounding words. “Word Workout,” a program developed by Nancy K. Lewkowicz, does instruct learners on how to pronounce multisyllabic words with the correctly stressed syllables, but it assumes students have already acquired knowledge of word parts and vowel combinations. This presentation will (a) describe the two strategies, (b) how they are blended at Morningside to make bigger gains than either program alone would accomplish, (c) data on the effectiveness of incorporating Lewkowicz’ procedures with Archer’s, and (d) data showing generativity of the mastered skills in new reading contexts.

 

Talk Aloud Problem Solving (TAPS): Defining Problems and Aims.

HALEY LANDAU (Morningside Academy), Erica Lybarger (Morningside Academy), Michael P. Wolfson (Morningside Academy), Joanne K. Robbins (Morningside Academy)

Abstract: Previously the focus of instruction in our Talk Aloud Problem Solving classes centered on the reasoning or problem solving component of the talk aloud process. This year, we provided a sequence of instruction that began by requiring students to identify the problem-to-solve. By looking at both abstract logic problems and everyday situations in life, we required students to examine situations, ask questions, and define the problem prior to practicing the repertoires required of the successful talk aloud reasoning process. The same language used by teachers to analyze conceptual learning, such as "attribute," "example", and "nonexample" were taught to the students during logic games such as those using attribute blocks; Mastermind; Bagels, Pico, Fermi; followed by the 20 Questions game and then Suchman Inquiry scenarios to build the yes/no question-generating repertoires. We grouped and regrouped students based upon their rates of acquiring these skills. This year, we introduced problem types in a track sequence rather than by unit. We will share data on rates of problem solving for problem types (analogy, Venn diagram, deductive reasoning) as a first step in identifying mastery rates or Aims for TAPS. A live demonstration of TAPS will be provided.

 

Combining the Power of Fluency, The Standard Celeration Chart, Reading Comprehension Strategies, Delayed Prompting, and Essay Writing.

MARIANNE DELGADO (Morningside Academy)

Abstract: This paper explores the combination of frequency measures and delayed prompting notation in the scoring of essay questions on reading comprehension tests. Problems occur when trying to gather data and measure growth on rubric scored essays alone, most important of which is distinguishing between students fluent in a skill and those needing much time, prompts and practice to reach a criterion answer. Acquiring sub-skills for discussing reading comprehension and practicing to fluency will be charted and explained. I will outline a new system of using the celeration chart to measure fluency, words per minute with a variable floor; independent learning skills, with a documentation of how often a teacher needs to prompt for criterion answer; and tracking growth on specific reading strategies, with essay questions geared towards target strategies taught in class. Several case studies and celeration charts of individual students’ progress throughout a school year will document the effectiveness of the system.

 

10:30am - 11:50am 

#203 Symposium: Producing Generative Outcomes, Part 2: From Practice to Research

5/24/2009

10:30 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

North 122 A

EDC/Applied Behavior Analysis

Producing Generative Outcomes, Part 2: From Practice to Research

Chair: Kerri L Kaelin (University of Nevada, Reno)

Discussant: Henry S. Pennypacker (University of Florida)

Abstract: Applied behavior analysis emphasizes the need for producing generative outcomes of interventions. However, empirically validated methods for producing generalized effects are scarce. The current symposium will outline three studies in which critical variables for the production of generative repertoires were identified. Specifically, the first study will describe how increasing frequency on a visual discrimination task produced a generalized rapid naming repertoire in young learners. The second study will compare a frequency-building versus a practice-only procedure on the emergence of a generalized decoding repertoire. The final study will illustrate the generative effects of a frequency-building procedure on derived relational responding. Studies will be discussed with respect to applied interventions guiding the design of controlled studies. The implications of each study on the development of best practice guidelines will be offered.

 

An Investigation of Rapid Automatic Naming as a Generalized Operant.

KERRI L KAELIN (University of Nevada, Reno), Kimberly Nix Berens (Center for Advanced Learning, Inc.), Patrick M. Ghezzi (University of Nevada)

Abstract: Traditional education uses Rapid Automatic Naming (RAN) to identify future reading problems with children. However, performance on RAN assessments is treated as an immutable trait. Conversely, from the perspective of behavior analysis, it is more useful to view RAN as operant behavior that can be strengthened through contingencies of reinforcement. An A/B multiple-probe design with two constant-series controls was used evaluate if RAN functions as generalized operant behavior. Specifically, preschool participants of normal development received training on one set of RAN skills while participating in probe sessions on an untrained set. Across experimental participants, an increase in times celerations occurred on the targeted task. Furthermore, effects were seen on untargeted tasks after implementation of the Precision Teaching intervention across all experimental participants. Generally, less robust effects occurred on probe tasks for the practice and probe control participant where little to no effects were observed for the probe-only participant.

 

Establishing the Role of Building Skills to High Frequencies on Outcome Performance.

MOLLY HALLIGAN (University Nevada, Reno), Kimberly Nix Berens (Center for Advanced Learning, Inc.), Patrick M. Ghezzi (University of Nevada)

Abstract: Traditional education implements procedures based on theories that have not empirically demonstrated successful educational achievement. Precision teaching, an area of behavior analysis, has analyzed techniques leading to robust learning outcomes through the use of a sensitive measurement tool. Unfortunately, the majority of findings are based on clinical rather than empirical studies. The current study examines the necessity of responding at high rates in producing robust learning outcomes. An A/B multiple probe design with yoked controls across participants was used. The participants were randomly assigned to either a frequency-building training condition or a practice-only training condition. Results are evaluated with respect to celerations and degrees of variability within and across participants for training, retention, distraction, frequency checks and probe performance.

 

? Building the Fluency of Derived Relational Responding: Frames of Coordination and Opposition.

NICHOLAS M. BERENS (UNR/CAL, Inc.), Kimberly Nix Berens (Center for Advanced Learning, Inc.), Steven C. Hayes (University of Nevada, Reno)

Abstract: Reading fluency has been strongly correlated with reading comprehension. However, for some individuals, increasing reading rate does not improve reading comprehension. It is posited that these individuals are lacking critical language skills. Relational Frame Theory posits that arbitrarily applicable derived relational responding is a critical behavioral target in the understanding of human language and cognition. In the context of the academically important task of vocabulary building, the current investigation explored procedures that increase the rate of derived relational responding. Procedures involved the establishment of base rates of derived relational responding across multiple sets of synonyms and antonyms. Subsequently, sets were isolated and the rates of the mutual and combinatorially entailed derived relational responses were strengthened. Correlated increases in the rate of derived relational responding in untargeted sets were noted.

 

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Posters

5:30pm - 7:00pm

#308 Poster Session

5/24/2009

5:30 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.

North Hall A

AUT

Autism. (Applied Behavior Analysis) JENNA RUDO-STERN (Private), Kelly J. Ferris (Organization for Research and Learning), Kristin N Wilkinson (Organization for Research and Learning)

Abstract: Designing instruction for children with autism should not only be effective, but also efficient. Programming for changes in composite skills as a result of intervention on component skills should be the interventionist’ goal. Interventionists should program for skills which will help students “learn to learn.” The “Big 6 Plus 6” (Desjardins, 1980) fine motor skills address component movements essential for a range of instructional, adaptive, and play skills. This data-based poster will illustrate the relationship between increasing the fluency of a one of the Big 6 Plus 6 Skills that resulted in a contingently improvement in composite play skills. A four year-old boy with autism received fluency-based instruction to increase his frequency of free/do grasp, reach and release with each his right and left hand. After reaching predicted frequency aim (Fabrizio & Moors, 2003) for this Free/Do learning channel changes in the boy’s toy play were measured. Data on Free/Do grasp, reach and release for each hand will be presented on the Standard Celeration Chart as well as data on the measured changes in the boy’s toy exploration and appropriate play.

 

#313 Poster Session

5/24/2009

5:30 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.

North Hall A

EDC

112. Overcoming Rate-Busting Manipulative to Establish Fluent Math Facts.

(EAB; Applied Behavior Analysis) AUDREY MITTAN (Student)

Abstract: A second grade student's of manipulatives to complete basic math problems became a rate buster when it was not properly faded. Precision teaching procedures were used to establish proper stimulus control and increase math-fact rates. Data illustrate how firming preskills resulted in large rate increases.

 

113. Teaching Shoe Tying Using a Large Scale Model.

(AUT; Applied Behavior Analysis) JILL HUNT (Judge Rotenberg Center), Matthew L. Israel (Judge Rotenberg Center), Michelle Harrington (Judge Rotenberg Center)

Abstract: In this study, we will discuss the use of specially created adaptive equipment in teaching shoe tying. We developed models with large scale representations of a shoe. Students became fluent on the skills, using the large shoe, and using small, pre-determined steps that are taught in a backward chaining sequence. Data will be plotted on a standard celeration chart. We will examine the generalization and long term retention of the skills taught using this adaptive equipment.

 

115. Improving Oral Reading Fluency in Elementary Students of American Indian Heritage with Learning Disabilities Using the Repeated Reading Instructional Approach.

(DDA; Applied Behavior Analysis) JENNIFER SUZANNE HEATH (Tiospa Zina Tribal School & The University of South Dakota), William J. Sweeney (The University of South Dakota)

Abstract: The purpose of this research demonstration project was to document the importance and effectiveness of a repeated practice procedures combined with Precision Teaching measurement approaches for assisting elementary students of American Indian ancestry who were diagnosed and enrolled in special education programs for students with learning disabilities and exhibited deficits in basic reading skills to improve their overall oral reading fluency. Few research studies focus on building oral reading fluency skills with students of American Indian ancestry, especially those exhibiting learning disabilities in the area of reading, and fewer yet combine Precision Teaching measurement approaches in the evaluation and effectiveness of repeated reading approaches to document gains in oral reading fluency. Besides the combination of Precision Teaching measurement methodologies to evaluate the relative effectiveness of these intervention procedures, few studies set out with the intent to document generalization and maintenance effect of these types of repeated practice procedures with students of American heritage enrolled in special education programs for students with learning disabilities. Students were selected from the special education program based upon identified reading deficits and the need to improve their speed and accuracy of reading decoding skills to assure that they were able to progress to more complex reading fluency related concepts. Students from these special education classes worked on a one-on-one or in small groups of 2 to 3 students with a trained and highly qualified special education teacher. This special education teacher used a combined one-minute repeated readings procedure with error correction as well as Precision Teaching evaluation approaches to document the students’ progress at building oral reading fluency. Maintenance and generalization procedures were also implemented to document the generalization of reading fluency across multiple reading probes as well as the relative ability of the participants to maintain this oral reading fluency performance 2, 4, and 6 weeks after the completion of the repeated readings and error correction procedures. The Standard Celeration Chart and the student’s daily performance were then evaluated at the conclusion of each repeated readings and error correction session. Implications and recommendations for use of these demonstration research activities for both students in general and special education settings as well as students of American Indian ancestry are also discussed.

 

116. The Effects of Response Amplitude on the Acquisition of Vocal Verbal Repertoire Using Fluency-Building.

(Applied Behavior Analysis) TAMRY L JUNTUNEN (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Charles Merbitz (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: Response amplitude has been largely under-researched in the field of Applied Behavior Analysis. Response amplitude indicates the force or intensity of a response and may be related to relative resistance to digression or extinction. Socially and academically it is important to be able to modulate the amplitude of speech. In this way, response amplitude holds social significance and justifies research in it’s own right. In this study, the relations among response amplitude and acquisition of vocal verbal behavior were evaluated using fluency-building. Eight graduate students served as participants in this study. Each participant was given SAFMEDS (flashcards) and assigned a specific response topography to emit during the practice and timing of the cards. Levels of fluency were then be compared across individuals and response topographies. The data are to be collected and analyzed. Results will be displayed on Standard Celeration Charts. The data may suggest that response amplitude contributes to the efficiency of acquiring vocal verbal behavior using fluency-building.

 

118. A Comparison of Yoked to Double Yoked Learning Channels on Skill Acquisition, Generalization, and Retention.

(DDA; Applied Behavior Analysis) VANESSA MOLDES (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Traci Cihon (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: The term “learning channels” was first coined by Ogden Lindsley in 1974 but they have been in use since 1969 (Lindsley, 1998). Learning channels can be described as behavioral throughputs which describe “the input or sensory modality involved with a stimulus and an output or behavior contained in the response” (Lin & Kubina, 2004, p. 1). The “in” part of the channel pertains to basic senses such as; think, touch, taste, sniff, see, hear and feel. The “out” part of the channel includes “movement cycle” verbs such as: aim, do, draw, mark, match, say, select, tap, and write. Learning channels have proven useful in the education system because they provide clear descriptions on how a student receives instruction and how the student is to respond to what is being presented. Haughton (1980) played an influential role in helping teachers develop a system for selecting learning channels by organizing sets of learning channels into matrices. The present study used a single-subject, multiple-baseline treatment design to evaluate and compare the learning, performance, generalization, and retention obtained from two yoked channels and one double yoked channel in teaching school-ages children with developmental disabilities universal symbols. The learning channels under investigation were: hearsee/say, hearsee/write, and hearsee/saywrite.

 

125. The Effects of Fluency-building Compared to Accuracy-only Conditions on Retention and Endurance.

(Applied Behavior Analysis) SHANNON S. FLEMING (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The
Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Denise E. Ross (Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

ADD ABSTRACT

 

126. Teaching and Re-teaching Handwriting Skills: Promoting Fluency with Precision Teaching

(DDA; Applied Behavior Analysis) Federica Berardo (Tice Learning Center), Sara Andolfi (Tice Learning Center), FRANCESCA CAVALLINI (university of parma)

Abstract: The study details the efforts to re-teach handwriting skills to 5 children with a diagnosis of dysgraphia The intervention focused on practicing handwriting tool elements. Participant were 5 boys (between the age of 8) with dysgraphia.The setting was located at Tice Learning Center in Italy. Skills were initially selected out of a list that are recommended for handwriting fluency (Freeman & Haughton, 1993 and Tice 2008, in press). We also used multiple-baseline to assess the effects of self-evaluation training on the legibility of cursive handwriting. All participants improved the legibility of their handwriting during the training. A systematic withdrawal of the training package demonstrated maintenance of treatment effects. For the most part, the students' handwriting remained at least 90% legible to judges following the systematic withdrawal of the training.

 

127. Endurance and Application in Young Basketball Players: Effects of Fluency in Dribbling.

(EAB; Applied Behavior Analysis) Silvia Perini (Università di Parma), FRANCESCA CAVALLINI (Università di Parma)

Abstract: Binder (1982, 1984; Binder et al., 1990) has reported research on the ability of students to perform for extended periods of time as a function of initial performance frequency. The study examines the effects of initial dribbling frequency in a group of 25 subjects (18 children, mean 9 years and 8 young man, mean 19 years) on endurance and application. Coaches collected samples of each players from repeatedly dribbling (in four conditions: right hand, right hand and blind, left hand and cross over) in ascending sequence: 5 s, 10 s, 1 min. Graphical and statistical analysis shows the effects of duration on frequency and errors in fluent and not fluent players.

 

129. Precision Teaching with Music Instruction: Are Fluent Fingers Music to Our Ears?

(Applied Behavior Analysis) ELIZABETH A MILES (Behavior Analyst)

Abstract: Music theory can be a difficult subject to teach, and often poses issues of skill mastery and retention. However, it is a crucial part of learning to play an instrument. The purpose of this study was to see if certain methods of study increases mastery and retention in music theory skills. The skills taught and tested were key signatures, time signatures, note names on, above, and below the staff via computerized lessons. An alternating treatment design was used with multiple subjects to compare teaching to fluency vs teaching to accuracy only. In the accuracy condition the participants were allowed to study until they reached an accuracy criterion and the fluency condition the participants were required to attain a fluency criterion. To test for retention, the students took a final quiz and then retested at two week intervals. Data will be collected on the duration required to complete each question on the quiz as well as their percent correct score under each condition

 

135. Evaluating Staff Training in an Inclusive Elementary Education Program.

(OBM; Service Delivery) VALORI N. BERENDS (Academy for Precision Learning), Lovelle T Suarez (Academy for Precision Learning)

Abstract: This study investigated the application of a precision teaching staff training protocol created for a home-based intervention program and applied in an inclusive elementary education program. Nine male and female staff members participated in the study. Approximately half of the staff members participating in the study possessed some degree of relevant experience from past employment. Staff ages ranged from 20 to 30 years. The study used a comparison design, and the program’s clinical director measured staff members’ knowledge and skill-building using a performance evaluation tool, assessments, and self-evaluative worksheets. Staff voluntarily scheduled evaluations, completed assessments and self-evaluative worksheets, and graphed their progress through the training. Staff received periodic opportunities to present their progress to the clinical director and earn performance-based pay for meeting training criterion. Findings of the study indicate future selection criteria for the inclusive elementary education program as well as considerations for training future staff in this setting.

#313 Poster Session

5/24/2009

5:30 p.m.- 7:00 p.m.

North Hall A

EDC

 

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Reunions 8:00pm - 10pm

THE OGDEN R. LINDSLEY STANDARD CELERATION CHART SHARE

#331 Reunion

SU 5/24/2009

8:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

North 131 BC

Chair: Malcolm D. Neely (Standard Celeration Society)

Purpose: The Ogden R. Lindsley Standard Celeration Chart Share provides ALL to see, hear, and share data across the behavior spectrum using daily, weekly, monthly, and yearly Standard Celeration Charts presented rapidly on overhead transparencies in spirited friendship.

http://www.abainternational.org/convention/downloads/5.24.09-8p-Reunions.pdf

Photo by John W. Eschleman

Abigail Calkin at ABA 2009 Chart Share

Abigail Calkin

Photo by John W. Eschleman 

Malcolm Neely and Nancy Merbitz

Malcolm Neely and Nancy Merbitz

 

THE ABA DEPARTMENT AT THE CHICAGO SCHOOL OF PROFESSIONAL PSYCHOLOGY: REUNION FOR ALUMNI, STUDENTS, FACULTY, AND FRIENDS.

 

#333 Reunion

SU 5/24/2009

8:00 p.m. - 10:00 p.m.

Maryvale AB, Sheraton

Chair: Charles Merbitz (Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Purpose: 2009 marks the fourth anniversary of ABAI, and hence the fifth anniversary of ABA, at The Chicago School (TCS). This event provides an opportunity for all TCS people to get together, and for people interested in the ABA Department to meet the faculty and students. All ABAI attendees are welcome to stop by, meet the TCS people, and help us celebrate our fifth! This reunion is co-sponsored by The B.F. Skinner Foundation, the Cambridge Center, and The Chicago School.

http://www.abainternational.org/convention/downloads/5.24.09-8p-Reunions.pdf

 

 

 

ABA Expo  10:00pm - 12:00am

33. Masters Programme in Applied Behaviour Analysis at the University of Wales, Bangor, UK .

J. CARL HUGHES (Bangor University, Wales), Steve Noone (University of Wales Bangor), Sandy Toogood (Wales Centre for Behaviour Analysis, School of Psychology, University of Wales, Bangor), Marguerite L. Hoerger (University of Wales, Bangor), Richard P. Hastings (University of Wales Bangor), Pauline Horne (University of Wales, Bangor), Corinna F. Grindle (University of Wales Bangor, UK)

Abstract: In 2003 we developed the first Masters course in Applied Behaviour Analysis in Europe. The course is designed and taught by Board Certified Behavior Analysts (BCBA) and has been approved by the Behavior Analysis Certification Board (BACB) as providing content eligibility for students to sit the full BCBA exam (3rd Task List). In line with the British University system, the course is offered at three levels: Post-graduate Certificate, Post-graduate Diploma, and Masters. In the design and running of the course we have attempted to use behavioural principles in the instructional materials, learning environments, and in the assessment of students learning. We utilise computer based instructional packages, direct instruction, and, Precision Teaching approaches, such as SAFMEDS and Standard Celeration Charting. The course can be taken in one year or on a part-time basis (either two or three years in duration). Each year we enrol approximately 30 students from a wide range of backgrounds: early autism intervention projects, challenging behaviour units, social services, special education, and new graduates. Our main aim is to make a significant contribution to training competent behaviour analysts in Europe.

 

34. The Chicago School of Professional Psychology.

CHARLES MERBITZ (Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Traci M. Cihon (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John P. Smagner (University of Chicago), David A. Pyles (Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Denise E. Ross (Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Diana J. Walker (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: The Chicago School of Professional Psychology is a not-for-profit graduate school located in Chicago's beautiful downtown. The Department of Applied Behavior Analysis currently enrolls 100 students in our two-year full time Masters in Clincial Psychology with a Specialization in ABA, and 16 students in our inaugural ABA PsyD class. Our aim is to produce graduates with outstanding ABA and clinical skills. The MA and PsyD. have BACB approved course sequences, so that graduates are eligible for the BCBA Exam and credential. Supervised field placements in local and out-of-town settings are available. We use behavioral approaches to education, such as the "Keller Plan" aka the Personalized System of Instruction (PSI), and Precision Teaching. This year we are particularly pleased to report on our expansion to public education settings in Chicago public schools. Our faculty members Traci Cihon, Ph.D., BCBA; John Eshleman, Ed.D., BCBA; John Smagner Ph.D., BCBA; David Pyles, Ph.D., BCBA; Denise Ross, Ph.D.; Diana Walker, Ph.D., BCBA; and the Department Chair, Charles Merbitz, Ph.D., BCBA, welcome you to ABAI and invite your questions. We are also very pleased to offer courses and/or supervision by Paul Holmes, Ph.D.; Yemonja Smalls, Ph.D., BCBA; Rachel Tarbox, Ph.D., BCBA; Kent Smallwood, PhD, and other talented behavior analysts. Further information is available at www.thechicagoschool.edu.

 

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Monday May 25, 2009

Presentations

10:30am - 11:50am

How We Finally Got There: Analytical Decisions Supported by the Standard Celeration Chart to Help Students Gain New Skills

#383 Symposium

5/25/2009

10:30 a.m. - 11:50 a.m.

North 125

AUT; Applied Behavior Analysis

Chair: Kelly J. Ferris (Organization for Research and Learning)

Abstract: The Standard Celeration Chart is a rigorous measurement tool that aids behavior analyst in making critical data-based decisions regarding the celeration, frequency, and bounce of students’ data. While teaching any range of skills to learners with autism and related developmental disabilities, behavior analysts must be highly attuned to the learner’s individual needs and must be able to adjust learning sequences according to the learner’s ever-changing performance data. Traditional sequences of instruction are often ineffective in establishing new skills for learners with autism. When student performance slows or stops, teachers must analyze the data to identify which variables to manipulate for the desired outcome in the most efficient manner. This symposium will present four papers illustrating the effects of manipulating schedules of reinforcement as well as altering various stimulus conditions to achieve important learning objectives for learners with developmental disabilities of various skill levels. All four papers utilize fluency based instruction as an independent variable with student performance data charted on the Standard Celeration Chart.

 

Treating Schedules of Reinforcement as Critical Features of Instruction to Increase the Frequency of Responding During Instruction in a Child with Phelan-McDermid Syndrome.

KELLY J. FERRIS (Organization for Research and Learning)

Abstract: In fluency based instruction teaching arrangements, reinforcement schedules are often treated as variable features of instruction, fluidly changing from timing to timing and from day to day based on changes in the student’s frequency of corrects, frequency of errors, and environmental conditions. With the analysis of in-session charted data, precision teachers are able to act as phenomenal shapers; they are masters of adjusting student feedback between fixed ratios of reinforcement and differential reinforcement of higher rates of behavior (DRH). This presentation will share performance data on a learner with Phelan-McDermind Syndrome whose behavior required more systematic and controlled changes to schedules of reinforcement to accelerate his frequency of responding. Multiple charts will be shown illustrating a replicated success of treating schedules of reinforcement as critical features of instruction: when schedules of reinforcement were gradually thinned through multiple fixed ratio schedules eventually to variable ratio schedules, student frequency of corrects increased, number of timings completed increased, and overall happiness with instruction increased.

 

Altering Stimulus Control and Variable Instructional Features While Teaching Intermediate/Advanced Language Skills.

HOLLY ALMON-MORRIS (Organization for Research and Learning)

Abstract: While teaching intermediate/advanced language skills to students with autism, there are often “roadblocks” that occur while navigating the previously-set instructional path. While teaching tact/intraverbals repertoires, teachers much be responsive to the data and adjust instructional sequences as needed. This presentation will highlight performance data from at least two students with autism and demonstrate how their performance data on the Standard Celeration Chart were analyzed to alter stimulus control or variable features of instruction, and the improvements in performance that resulted from those instructional changes. Independent variables include timed practice combined with daily improvement goals, differential reinforcement of higher rates of behavior (DRH), and Modified Mathetics error correction procedures (Gilbert, 1962). Dependent variables include various intermediate/advanced language skills within the tact/intraverbal repertoire areas. In addition to the performance data mentioned above, supplementary data will be collected before this symposium submission takes place. Further relational aspects of modifying stimulus control and variable instructional features will also be discussed.

 

If You Give Me a Reason, I Can Show You What I Know.

KRISTA ZAMBOLIN (Organization for Research and Learning), Michael Fabrizio (Organization for Research and Learning)

Abstract: Securing student assent and happiness during instruction is an essential component of effective and efficient behavior analytic programming. Collecting data on student’s choosing to participate willing in instruction should be collected as a dependent variable illustrating effective programming for all learners. This paper will describe how data analysis and analysis of the student’s perspective helped in problem solving an effective instructional sequence for teaching a very young learner with autism imitation skills and receptive language skills. The student was a 3 year-old girl who had been involved in a home-based behavior analytic program since 2007. Utilizing fluency based instructional arrangement and data displayed on the Standard Celeration Chart, the instructional team identified critical features of instruction necessary to gain happy student participation. Data will show how manipulating different stimulus and reinforcement conditions were tested across both see/do imitation and hear/touch and hear/do learning channel repertoires. Charted student learning data will illustrate how the teachers finally identified the student’s definition of “functional” to gain her assent and consistent participation and learning during instruction.

 

Altering Stimulus Control to Establish Early Language Skills in Children with Autism. POSTER ATTACHED

ELIZABETH GRACE LEFEBRE (Organization for Research and Learning), Kelly J. Ferris (Organization for Research and Learning)

Abstract: Establishing early language skill repertoires in children with autism requires carefully planned sequences of instruction. It can be additionally challenging when the proposed instructional sequence is at first, unsuccessful. Quality programming should ensure that skills come under the intended stimulus control. Planning for appropriate stimulus control by ensuring critical and variable features of instruction are addressed is an essential step in the design of effective instructional programs. Purposely using inappropriate stimulus control to elicit responses in new repertoire areas is often conducted through by inserting extrinsic prompts into a teaching sequence. Creating inappropriate stimulus control by manipulating different degrees of variable features in instructional materials is less commonly used as a teaching strategy. The presentation will examine the use of inappropriate stimulus control to elicit new responses by systematically graduating the range of variable features from mostly shared to few shared to shape student responding in visual aand receptive language tasks. Student learning data will be displayed on the Standard Celeration Chart.

 

3:00pm - 4:20pm

ABA in the Schools: Using Behavioral Techniques to Help Students in General Education Classrooms

#463 Symposium

5/25/2009

3:00 p.m. - 4:20 p.m.

North 121 A

EDC; Applied Behavior Analysis

Chair: Monika M. Suchowierska (Warsaw School of Social Psychology)

Discussant: Linda S. Heitzman-Powell (University of Kansas)

Abstract: This symposium will consist of three presentations and remarks from the discussant. The first presentation will provide a review of applications of ABA in the schools and will create conceptual and empirical background for the following two presentations. Four main teaching paradigms that have been derived from behavior analysis will be discussed. Challenges to the wide use of ABA in the schools will be presented. The second presentation will show data on implementing a training package to improve behavior management skills of one teacher and the effects of the changes in the teacher’s behavior on the students’ behavior. The last presentation will show data on using behavioral techniques to improve academic skills and participation in the lessons of three typically-developing children attending first and third grades of public general education classrooms. The discussant will be asked to remark on the three presentations and conclude with comments on the role of behavior analysts in the schools.

 

Review of Applications of ABA in the Schools.

MONIKA M. SUCHOWIERSKA (Warsaw School of Social Psychology)

Abstract: This presentation will provide an overview of using behavioral techniques to improve students’ performance and teaching methods as well as to reduce problem behavior in the general education classrooms. Four main teaching paradigms that have been derived from behavior analysis will be discussed (i.e., programmed instruction, personalized system of instruction, direct instruction and precision teaching). Major accomplishments of ABA in general education classrooms and challenges to the wide use of ABA in the schools will be presented.

 

Language: Its Role in Indigenous Education, Poverty, and Culture

#479 Symposium

5/25/2009

3:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m.

North 122 A

EDC/CSE; Experimental Analysis

Chair: Abigail B. Calkin (Calkin Consulting Center)

Abstract: Indigenous and minority education has not kept pace with the educational progress of Western Europeans in the same regions. Confronted by language and cultural losses, indigenous and minority people try to meld yet retain their way of life. Looking at the circumpolar nations’ practices as well as Native and minority cultures, we notice that cultural practices and language have often been snatched away in favor of the more dominant, western way of life. These small groups and the governments around the Northern Hemisphere have begun to look at the impact of these practices and how to preserve Native integrity while blending into the local, national pot. Is this even possible? Yes, but the results and potential for success hinge on the role central government plays and on increasing the present low language skills through programs such as Direct Instruction and Language for Learning. The participants, who work with the education of minority groups, will share standardized and standard celeration charted data from their work with Native Americans, First Nations, African Americans, and Hispanics. Data collected and analyzed from thousands of students show that we can educate people at the 80th percentile while retaining cultural heritages.

 

3:30-4:50PM

Practice-Based Evidence in Public Education: Systematic On-site Consultation and Special Education for Students with Autism.

#471 Symposium

5/25/2009

3:30 p.m. - 4:50 p.m.

North 124 A

AUT/VRB; Service Delivery

Practice-Based Evidence in Public Education: Ssystematic On-site Consultation and Special Education for Students with Autism.

Chair: Michael Miklos (Pennsylvania Training and Technical Assistance Net)

Abstract: Technical support to special education teachers often consists of verbal “stand and deliver” trainings removed from classroom environments. Teachers often attend didactic trainings in order to receive continuing education credit without a systematic process for transferring verbal training to actual repertoires in the classroom setting. The brief reports included in this symposium will highlight efforts to provide direct on-site training to special education staff. Each report will review components of a system of technical support driven by procedural integrity and supporting data based systems of instruction. Data summarizing a

variety of consultative efforts will be presented. Primary emphasis of discussion will be on explicit procedural processes for instructional staff that generate evidence of individual student performance. The range of processes to be discussed include training in single subject design to enhance instructional skills of teachers, use of procedural descriptions of consultation to improve instructional fidelity, third party review of instructional implementation as a system of classroom organizational management, and explicit feedback as a means to training instructional fidelity for discrete trial instruction.

 

Integration of Manualization and Direct Feedback Processes for Training Intensive Teaching of the Verbal Operants. MARY L. BARBERA (PA Verbal Behavior Project)

 

Integration of Manualization and Direct Feedback Processes for Training Intensive Teaching of the Verbal Operants. MARY L. BARBERA (PA Verbal Behavior Project)

Abstract: Through transcription of instructional behavior, direct feedback can be provided to instructors in relation to established discrete trial procedures. Examples of this process will be provided. This report will describe implementation of a system for feedback based on direct observation of teacher behavior as a training system and its relation to student skill acquisition. The model of discrete trial instruction used includes interspersed trials, with balanced high probability and low probability tasks, errorless procedures for instructional acquisition targets, and focuses primarily on acquisition of the verbal operants as identified in Skinner, 1957. The transcription process involves coding instructional behavior of discrete trial instructors in relation to student behavior with formalized codes. The staff training procedure to be described here will include four components:

1.Viewing and documenting a training DVD which specifies the components of the discrete trial teaching process.

2.Practicing presenting discrete trials with guided practice

3.Receiving direct feedback on actual teaching practice with data derived from the transcription process

4.Continuous process of student acquisition of skills taught through the discrete trial teaching.

 

Posters 12:00 - 1:30PM

#411 Poster Session AUT

5/25/2009

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

North Hall A

1. Using TAG Teach Methods to Develop Eye Contact Behavior in Children with Autism.

(Applied Behavior Analysis) REGINA L. MAENDLER (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Traci M. Cihon (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

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Photo by Regina Claypool-Frey

John W. Eshleman and Regina Maendler

 

2. Comparing the Effectiveness of Mobile and Immobile Floors for Teaching Fine Motor Skills.

(Applied Behavior Analysis) NICOLE ANN CISSELL (The Chicago School of Professional Psych.), John W Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Traci M. Cihon (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: Ogden Lindsley (1963) was one of the first behavior analysts to define the need for fluency. Fluency is necessary to achieve automaticity and permanency in responding (Binder, Haughton, & Eyk, 1990) and has been defined as accuracy plus speed (Binder, 1996). Precision teachers use the tools of fluency and the Standard Celeration Chart (SCC) in order to improve learning and track changes in behavior. The SCC is a semi-logarithmic chart in which changes in learning may be observed. The chart utilizes many symbols in order to denote the frequency of behaviors, the length of fluency timings, and celeration as a function of time. This paper reports the results of a study aimed as evaluating the efficacy of mobile versus immobile floors for teaching fine motor skills to children that have been diagnosed with autism. The study was conducted using Big 6+6 programming in order to teach the component fine motor skills.

 

35. A Fluency Program Using the “Big 6+6” to Improve Toothbrushing Skills for Children with Autism.

(CBM; Applied Behavior Analysis) ERICA CHRISTINE LIDDICOAT (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), John W. Eshleman (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: Children with autism may experience more dental problems due to oral sensitivities around the mouth, diet, difficulty accessing dental care, and difficulty brushing. Tooth decay can attack the teeth at any age, in fact, 84% of 17-year-olds have the disease and 60% of 15-year-olds experience gingivitis, the first stage of gum disease (Nemours Foundation, 2008). Tooth decay can cause severe pain and result in tooth loss. Losing teeth affects how you look and feel about yourself as well as your ability to chew and speak. The participants were school-age students who attended a school that provides services children with autism. The students age range from 8 to 22. Fluency training of the “Big 6+6” was used to improve the fine motor movements required for toothbrushing (reach, twist, place, grasp, squeeze, release, push, pull). Data to be collected and will be presented on Standard Celeration Charts.

Keywords: fluency, “Big 6+6”, dental hygiene, autism

 

40. A Comparison of the Instructional Time for Two Tact Instruction Procedures with Adolescents with Autism.

(VRB; Applied Behavior Analysis) LESLIE MARGARET CANHAM (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Charles Merbitz (Chicago School of Professional Psychology), Denise E. Ross (Chicago School of Professional Psychology)

Abstract: This study investigated the instructional time required for adolescents with autism to acquire tacts using two different instructional procedures. The experiment compared the Accelerated Independent Learner (AIL) model used in the Comprehensive Application of Behavior Analysis (CABAS) educational model and the AIL model with Precision Teaching components. Intensive Tact Instruction (ITI) was used in the AIL alone condition. A yoked control comparison, over 5 sets of curricular materials counterbalanced for difficulty, was used to measure AIL/ITI procedures against AIL with Precision Teaching components. Data were collected on the number of correct and incorrect responses to probe trials and the teaching time required for mastery using the AIL/ITI method, and the frequency of correct and incorrect responses to timed probe trials using the AIL model with Precision Teaching components. Results will be discussed in terms of the number of tacts acquired and the rate of responding, when instructional time was held constant, using the AIL/ITI method and the AIL model with Precision Teaching components.

 

#414 Poster Session

5/25/2009

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

North Hall A

DDA

81. Big 6+6 Instruction with a Student with Severe Physical Impairment.

(EDC; Service Delivery) PATRICE L HENDERSON (The Chicago School of Professional Psychology/The Hope Institute)

Abstract: Students with severe physical impairments and limited physical mobility have difficulty completing tasks that require the use of fine motor skills. Because of their limited mobility and limited ability in fine motor skill applications participation in everyday school activities is slower and less independent. These students often require full hand on hand physical prompting and one-on-one assistance because component skills are not at fluent levels. Precision Teaching (PT) literature has shown that when component skills reach fluent levels then the performance of a composite skill is improved. This study will evaluate the effects of the timed practice of component motor skills on the completion of a composite skill with a student with severe physical impairment. The participant in this study is a 14-year-old male with severe physical impairment and moderate cognitive impairment. He is unable to perform independently in school activities. The goal of the study is for the participant to improve component skills in order to perform a composite skill at his individual aim.

 

6:00-7:30 PM

#487 Poster Session A AUT

5/25/2009

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

North Hall A

AUT

 

36. Teaching an Adolescent with ASD to Compose an Email.

(N/A; Applied Behavior Analysis) ALLISON LETCHER (Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of ), Jamie Rose Feddock (FEAT of WA), Sara J. Pahl (Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of Washington)

Abstract: Communicating and reporting important information such as events of an individual’s day can be a difficult skill for some learners with ASD. The use of email is one tool we use in the Transitions for Teens program to teach adolescent clients with ASD how to communicate important information to others. Before reporting important information in an email, clients must also learn how to navigate a web-based e-mail service. Data presented on the Standard Celeration Chart will demonstrate how the use of forward chaining and prompt fading procedures helped teach an 18-year-old adolescent girl with a diagnosis of ASD to navigate a web-based email service and compose an email. The email composition included reporting events of the client’s day, while also including the client’s likes and dislikes. Intervention was provided at our center in a 1:1 instructional arrangement and in the community during the Transitions for Teens program at Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of Washington.

 

37. Teaching an Adolescent to Tact Environmental Triggers and Private Events to Help Improve Self-management Skills.

(N/A; Applied Behavior Analysis) SARAH PROCHAK (Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of Washington), Jamie Rose Feddock (FEAT of WA), Sara J. Pahl (Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of Washington)

Abstract: Learning how to tact known, and potential environmental triggers, in a variety of settings is an important skill for improving self-management behaviors with clients that are learning how to mange or regulate their problem behaviors independently. Identifying triggers and private events are not only skills that are needed to help cope with stressful situations, but also gain independence and control over one’s environment. Discussing stressful situations in a structured setting provides the client the opportunity to identify these triggers without yet having to engage in them in the natural environment. This poster will demonstrate how we taught a 13-year-old female client diagnosed with Smith-Lemli-Opitz Syndrome and ASD, how to tact known and potential triggers in her environment, while also tacting private events that may correlate with overt responses or problem behaviors. Data collected on problem behaviors and tacting triggers as they occurred in the natural environment or community setting will be presented using the Standard Celeration Chart. Intervention was provided at our center in and in the community during the Transitions for Teens program at Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of Washington.

 

39. Fluency and Agility: Outcomes of Teaching Background Knowledge to a 9 Year-Old Boy with Autism. POSTER ATTACHED

 

(N/A; Applied Behavior Analysis) TERESA MCCANN (Organization for Research and Learning), Holly Almon-Morris (Organization for Research and Learning)

Abstract: Children with autism often lack fluent language skills related to general knowledge about places, people, and things common in their communities. These dysfluent tact and intraverbal repertoires often restrict student participation in general education curriculum and limit conversation topics. However, teaching every background information concept would require extensive effort and time. Designing instruction related to “infinite” instructional topics should target the goal of agility. Instruction should proceed with the goal of learners “learning to learn” by acquiring new information with less effort and in less instructional time. This poster will present data on applying Fluency Based Instruction to improve the background information of a 9 year-old boy with autism. Inadequate progress in a language Direct Instruction program called for more specialized instruction to improve his rate of acquisition of sequellically controlled targets. Charted performance data on the Standard Celeration Chart indicate the learner not only reached predicted frequency aims for the Hear/Say learning channel (Fabrizio & Moors, 2003), but he also achieved agility. Student performance data will also show the learner passing empirically validated outcomes related to retention, endurance, stability, and application.

 


#489 Poster Session DDA

5/25/2009

6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.

North Hall A

 

75. Precision Teaching and Speed Reading.

(VRB; Applied Behavior Analysis) GUNN LOKKE (University College of Ostfold, Norway), Jon A. Lokke (University College of Ostfold, Norway), Erik Arntzen (Akershus University College)

Abstract: Speed-reading techniques are widely used and generally accepted, but few reports on its effectiveness have been made. In one of few studies on the effectiveness of speed reading, students on average doubled their reading speed (Schmidt, 1972). Calef et al. (1999) conclude that measurable changes in reading eye movements and reading speed accompany successful completion of a speed-reading course in normally developed students. We have found no reports on the use of the techniques in children with retardation. We present the use of speed-reading and Precision Teaching procedures in a 14 year old boy with mild mental retardation and reactive attachment disorder. At baseline his average reading speed at school was 80 correct wpm with 4 learning opportunities, and 42 correct and 2 LOs at home. After four and 12 weeks respectively, average wpm increased to 150 correct and 1 learning opportunity at school and 100 correct wpm and 2 LOs at home.

 

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Tuesday May 26, 2009

 

Presentations

9:00am - 10:20am

Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of Washington's Center Based Programs for Individuals with ASD

#516 Symposium

5/26/2009

9:00 a.m. - 10:20 a.m.

North 127

AUT/EDC; Service Delivery

Chair: Kristin N. Schirmer-Foley (Organization for Research and Learning & FEAT of Washington)

Discussant: Kristin N. Schirmer-Foley (Organization for Research and Learning & FEAT of Washington)

Abstract: Since 1996, FEAT of Washington has been helping families with loved ones with autism find resources, get educated on effective treatment, and network with other families who are on the same journey. FEAT fosters the essential elements to support, guide, and respond to the needs of families and professionals in the community. Through the years, FEAT has expanded into an organization that not only helps families through resource referrals, but also through prudent investments in high-quality, evidence based, and replicable programs. This symposium will provide information regarding two of FEAT of Washington’s Center Based Programs; Rising Star Academy an inclusive preschool program, and Transitions for Teens an adolescent and young adult program. Both programs will present outcomes data as well as social validity data that align with FEAT of Washington’s mission statement: Feat of Washington provides families with hope and guidance to help their children with autism reach their full potential.

 

Rising Star Academy: A Successful Inclusive Preschool Program for all Students.

KRISTIN N. SCHIRMER-FOLEY (Organization for Research and Learning & FEAT of Washington), Elizabeth B Snyder (FEAT of Washington), Brandi Michelle Allred (FEAT of Washington)

Abstract: Why send a typically developing child to an inclusive preschool that specializes in Autism Spectrum Disorder? Rising Star Academy is an inclusive preschool program for children on the Autism Spectrum and their typically developing peers. This data based paper will discuss the annual progress made by all children, both with and without Autism Spectrum Disorder and will show that meaningful growth occurred across both groups of students. Data collected includes micro, meta and macro examples from multiple students who attend Rising Star Academy. Micro and meta data samples will include Fluency Based Instruction data, Precision Teaching data and Direct Instruction data. In addition, macro data was collected on pre and posttest scores in the areas of language development, social skills, independent skills, general development and classroom adaptive behaviors. Student objectives were highly individualized and meaningful growth occurred on individual objectives as well as on pre and post assessments for all children: those with ASD and those without.

 

Transition Programming for Adolescents with Autism.

SARA J. PAHL (FEAT of WA), Jamie Rose Feddock (FEAT of WA), Andrew M. Syvertsen (FEAT of Washington) 

Abstract: Transitions for Teens (TFT) is a clinical intervention program that that seeks to significantly improve adolescents and young adults self-determination, independence, and quality of life provided by high-quality behavior analytic services delivered through individual and comprehensive programs that increase their social competence and build skills necessary to access and navigate their world while also respecting individual preference and rights. Skills targeted for clients enrolled in the Transitions for Teens program are individualized, yet fall within the repertoire areas of; navigation, socialization, self-advocacy, self-management, communication, production, safety, health, and leisure. This paper will focus on providing (1) A brief overview and history of the program (2) Examples of outcomes data will include; Macro, Meta, and Micro level assessment data, as well as social validity collected across families and community members. (3) We will also include a brief overview of staff structure, staff training procedures, as well as enhancements made to the program this year.

 

Does Community-Based Instruction Impact Community Members, If so, What Impact Have we Made?

SARA J. PAHL (FEAT of Washington), Andrew M. Syvertsen (FEAT of Washington), Michael Fabrizio (Families for Effective Autism Treatment (FEAT) of Washington), Jamie Rose Feddock (FEAT of WA) 

Abstract: Transitions for Teens (TFT) is a clinical intervention program that that seeks to significantly improve adolescents and young adults self-determination, independence, and quality of life provided by high-quality behavior analytic services delivered through individual and comprehensive programs that increase their social competence and build skills necessary to access and navigate their world while also respecting individual preference and rights. Specifically, TFT targets skills within the area of navigation, socialization, self-advocacy, self-management, communication, production, safety, health, and leisure. Community-Based Instruction is the primary instructional arrangement used within TFT. All clients’ objectives are targeted and taught in the community daily, which means staff and clients are interacting with community members daily. With this level of exposure, it is important to assess the impact the program has on the larger community, as well as the impact the community has on the program.

This paper will focus on providing (1) Interview and observational data collected on community members interactions with clients, as well as describing the impact our program has had on individual community members. (2) Data based decisions used to inform Community-Based staff training procedures in regards to teaching, intervening, and assessing clients in the community, as well as shaping community members behaviors.

 

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2/8/08

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